Blasphemax

Maximillian was a boy

and oh, how coy was this boy

to alleviate his cordoroy!

It's almost scary

to think of Teresa and Mary

as an audience not contrary

to the values Max deluged

when he let his purity sploodge.

Truly, the epitome

of a gracious, Christian youth

from the window

to the booth

 

Sweet, beautiful Mary

whom birthed the lord, himself

Maximillian says,

"'Tis to your health!

For this ambition

is to carry on your tradition

'Obstinate in abstinence'

be a powerful volition.

Pardon my weak-willedness

but I require surrogates

in such an ideal mission."

 

To the pastor

(whom is master

of the chapel)

whom proclaimed "nevermore!"

to the controversies of before,

when his colleague stood accused

of abuse,

(likening a child to a whore)

and rejecting the notion

that, breaking devotion

the holy men betrayed themselves

by a Mary exchange,

(yet, with someone else)

Maximillian remained guiltless,

defending himself with this

rationalization,

of acting on his own temptation

(although behind a damaged reputation,

every train goes to its station,

credit to you

which credit is due,

the defense was thoughtful 

(and logical, too!))

 

"If our seeds aren't to be spilled on the ground, then where should they go?

For the ground is from whence all life grows!

Like Adam, who arose from the dust

I'm simply doing what I must

to remain fruitful

with a mind-set agricultural!

  And ask any yeomen,

he surely will tell,

of the factors which most cause

his planting of crops to become toil,

it's not the flood or drought,

but the soil.

So, really, my peculiar allocation;

being that of holy ground,

is actually the place which suits seeds well

for crops are prosperous in Heaven,

not Hell. 

  Yet, it is known

men can't live on bread alone,

the savior is one whom they must have known.

Simply, like any good acquantince

I established, with companion's parent

a strong affiliation

(this I'd believe an unconflicted statement,

for the magnitude of my acquaintment

is, quite literally,

biblically)."

 

To this, the father had but one resound

"zounds!"

Out in the public, the story caused quite a racket

so the father thought of a way to retract it.

 

He thought of a lesson, as all pastors should

he gave it to Max, to make him good.

In a circle of dirt, the priest said,

"Max, this is your field,

this round little bed,

plant in it now,

as to rest your head."

Maximillian obeyed, without second thought

and planted an acorn

into the little plot.

 

An elaborate scorn

awaited Max

when the priest brought him back;

When the tree reached full mass

"See," said the father,

"When I had you plant this tree that day,

in this very plot,

I had already thought

of my own little plot.

For the sake of turning something I need to say,

into something I've said,

I bring you back here, to this very bed.

See this tree?"



"Ye, I do."
 

"Pay attention,

it encapsulates an important lesson

for you.

  You say you're a farmer,

because you planted this seed,

this, however, your blasphemy does not areed.

You are more akin to this worm, or this weed.

  The weed for bad discipline;

the malignant way you've articulated our lessons

does not make you a good Christian,

it elects you for equivocation professions.

It does as you do,

absorbing the roots,

in lieu

of our bedrock truths;

in creating a new force,

you destroy the source.

  Next is the worm,

which you've earned for bad form.

You deal with Earth, sure

that is correct,

but more-so than a farmer,

in this creature's respect

(even if he slithers,

and you be erect)

your assesment of allocation is errant,

for this worm doesn't belong here,

that is apparent.

On holy ground, cylinders spewing filth

are not of our ilk.

  Lastly, the tree itself, perhaps most noteworthy of all,

with its clear girth, how strong and how tall!

Though you be in its position,

you differ in disposition,

for the only wood which be suitable to found the church

Is that which grows from, not of, the Earth."

 

Maximillian, though most deviant,

posseses cunning most convenient.

In response to his trouble,

he thought of a rebuttal

most expedient.

 

"You call me a weed,

yet I spot in you the same malignance

which you accuse me of,

via misplaced possesive;

'Our' ideals, you state,

as if commoners aren't allowed to participate;

as if the clergy

be the only worthy

members of the church; 

the only one to interpret (and alter)

its works.

Let me remind you that, if this were the case

you would dwell in much different estates;

if you held that much worth

you'd live in Heaven, not Earth.

  Then, the worm,

which on me you've pinned for bad form

is a necessity, whose necessity you overturn.

They are the soil managers,

and henceforth the Earth's substantiators;

the ground is better for which the worm

has beaten,

eaten,

and does overturn;

their redirection

brings any ground (holy or unholy)

nearer perfection.

  Of the tree,

I will see,

this tree is not me,

but not on the grounds of your indication,

(for I bear counter-stipulation;

a tree holds no ideology)

instead, for that, of a differed rationalization.

This tree and I hold different positions,

which result in differed dispositions;

Its responsibility: material

to be of use

Mine: worker

to make use.

Churches are not built by trees,

they're built with trees,

by men with pads on their knees.

I am the worker, not the source,

such an occupation requires force;

a proper force which I exerted

when I left my love deserted."

 

"Indeed you have," replied the priest,

"Your mendacity attests to this, in the least.

I pose you with this inquiry,

not meant to be a threat,

but of all your actions, which is the best?

Is it this one you defened, strainly,

or rather one which accomodates itself, plainly?"

 

"I suppose the latter," Max admitted,

and, in so, relented.

 

"Then, let me put it simply,

and have it simply put;

it's simple to understand,

simply understood;

forget the figurative weed, worm, and wood,

if it was good,

it would've seemed good."

 

"You said 'would'

in place of 'should.' "

 

" 'Should' alone

is enough to have known."

 

And with that simple statement,

Max abandoned his abatement

and gave in to

undisputable, simple virtue.

 

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